Discussion:
LXD project status
(too old to reply)
Steven Spencer
2018-03-27 17:19:55 UTC
Permalink
This is probably a message that Stephane Graber can answer most
effectively, but I just want to know that the LXD project is continuing to
move forward. Our organization did extensive testing of LXD in 2016 and
some follow-up research in 2017 and plan to utilize this as our
virtualization solution starting in April of this year. In 2017, there were
updates to LXD at least once a month, but the news has been very quiet
since December.

To properly test LXD as it would work in our environment, we did extensive
lab work with it back in 2016 and some follow-up testing in 2017. While we
realize that there are no guarantees in our industry, I'd just like to know
that, at least for now, LXD is still a viable project and that development
hasn't suddenly come to a screeching halt.

Thanks for your consideration.

Steve Spencer
Sean McNamara
2018-03-27 17:33:45 UTC
Permalink
I'm sure stgraber will weigh in to provide the details of the
project's long-term plans, but here are a few things to think about
meanwhile:

1. It looks like they're preparing for LXD 3.0. This hasn't taken the
shape of any stable releases since December, true, but there are
frequent beta releases -- here's the commit for beta 7 just recently,
and it seems there's been a beta approximately weekly since about the
new year. https://github.com/lxc/lxd/commit/8cc13c42f1c34408ca66b875394ffa81ff70fa59

2. A lack of consistent releases doesn't necessarily mean a project is
dead. It can mean the project is in a really good state right now and
doesn't really need improvement, or the developers are spending a lot
of time working on big new features that require a lot of work before
anything can be demoed or merged into master, even in prerelease
shape.

3. If you're planning to use LXD for a commercial purpose, I would
strongly suggest investing in paid support from Canonical to get that
extra assurance of the continuity of support longer term. They still
offer this on their website, which tells me they must be retaining
some LXD developers who can help you and actually provide that
support, including patches if you find bugs that are breaking your
production workloads. Your investment in LXD support would also go a
long way to helping ensure the project remains maintained for the
foreseeable future, even if you don't need any patches yourself.

Canonical may have had some spectacular product failures in recent
years (Ubuntu Phone, Unity among others), but I don't think LXD is
among them. And in any case, when you are assessing the activity of a
project, check the Git commit logs (including in feature branches, not
just master) rather than the releases -- releases don't say a whole
lot about a product's activity; Git commits are a finer-grained
indicator.

Good luck,

Sean
This is probably a message that Stephane Graber can answer most effectively,
but I just want to know that the LXD project is continuing to move forward.
Our organization did extensive testing of LXD in 2016 and some follow-up
research in 2017 and plan to utilize this as our virtualization solution
starting in April of this year. In 2017, there were updates to LXD at least
once a month, but the news has been very quiet since December.
To properly test LXD as it would work in our environment, we did extensive
lab work with it back in 2016 and some follow-up testing in 2017. While we
realize that there are no guarantees in our industry, I'd just like to know
that, at least for now, LXD is still a viable project and that development
hasn't suddenly come to a screeching halt.
Thanks for your consideration.
Steve Spencer
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
Stéphane Graber
2018-03-27 17:44:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Spencer
This is probably a message that Stephane Graber can answer most
effectively, but I just want to know that the LXD project is continuing to
move forward. Our organization did extensive testing of LXD in 2016 and
some follow-up research in 2017 and plan to utilize this as our
virtualization solution starting in April of this year. In 2017, there were
updates to LXD at least once a month, but the news has been very quiet
since December.
To properly test LXD as it would work in our environment, we did extensive
lab work with it back in 2016 and some follow-up testing in 2017. While we
realize that there are no guarantees in our industry, I'd just like to know
that, at least for now, LXD is still a viable project and that development
hasn't suddenly come to a screeching halt.
Thanks for your consideration.
Steve Spencer
We normally release a new feature release every month and have been
doing so until the end of December where we've then turned our focus on
our next Long Term Support release, LXD 3.0 which is due out later this
week.

So It's actually been much more busy since December than it was before,
as we included a number of major features such as LXD clustering.

To track project activity, you may be interested in reading our weekly
status updates:

https://discuss.linuxcontainers.org/tags/weekly
--
Stéphane Graber
Ubuntu developer
http://www.ubuntu.com
Michel Jansens
2018-03-27 18:45:03 UTC
Permalink
Hi Stéphane,

Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?

Cheers,
Michel
Post by Stéphane Graber
We normally release a new feature release every month and have been
doing so until the end of December where we've then turned our focus on
our next Long Term Support release, LXD 3.0 which is due out later this
week.
Stéphane Graber
2018-03-27 19:02:02 UTC
Permalink
Yes
Hi Stéphane,
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
Cheers,
Michel
Post by Stéphane Graber
We normally release a new feature release every month and have been
doing so until the end of December where we've then turned our focus on
our next Long Term Support release, LXD 3.0 which is due out later this
week.
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
--
Stéphane Graber
Ubuntu developer
http://www.ubuntu.com
Michel Jansens
2018-03-27 19:05:22 UTC
Permalink
Great!, I’m looking forward to that :-)

Michel
Post by Stéphane Graber
Yes
Hi Stéphane,
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
Cheers,
Michel
Post by Stéphane Graber
We normally release a new feature release every month and have been
doing so until the end of December where we've then turned our focus on
our next Long Term Support release, LXD 3.0 which is due out later this
week.
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
--
Stéphane Graber
Ubuntu developer
http://www.ubuntu.com
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
Steven Spencer
2018-03-27 20:39:55 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for all of the comments back.

Per Sean McNamara's numbered remarks:

1.) That makes sense and it is what I figured
2.) I'm fully aware of project status coming into a stable state, I was
just trying for some clarity, which both you and Stéphane have provided
3.) This is always a good idea and I may personally contribute. I can't
necessarily depend on my company to do so, even thought that is the way
things /should/ work.

Per Stéphane Graber:

Thanks again, that all makes sense.
Great!, I’m looking forward to that :-)
Michel
Yes
Post by Michel Jansens
Hi Stéphane,
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
Cheers,
Michel
Post by Stéphane Graber
We normally release a new feature release every month and have been
doing so until the end of December where we've then turned our focus on
our next Long Term Support release, LXD 3.0 which is due out later this
week.
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
--
Stéphane Graber
Ubuntu developer
http://www.ubuntu.com
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
gunnar.wagner
2018-03-29 01:32:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michel Jansens
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
I guess (as LXD is using snap packages by default, right) it's not a
matter of distribution any lomnger but more of distribution able to run
snap packages well (which not every distribution does as far as I know
[i.e. OpenSUSE])
Simos Xenitellis
2018-03-29 12:44:19 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 4:32 AM, gunnar.wagner
Post by Michel Jansens
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
I guess (as LXD is using snap packages by default, right) it's not a matter
of distribution any lomnger but more of distribution able to run snap
packages well (which not every distribution does as far as I know [i.e.
OpenSUSE])
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be based on LXD 3.0.xx, supported until 2018+5y = 2023.
Those that have the LXD snap ('lxd', stable channel), are likely to
get upgraded to 3.1, 3.2 and so on,
as the new versions appear.
It was mentioned on the forum in December that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will
have by default the .deb version of LXD 3.0.

This happened with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which has LXD 2.0.xx (currently at 2.0.11)
and is supported until 2021. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was launched with the
new LXD 2.0 at that time.

When you do 'snap info lxd', you get

...
channels:
stable: 2.21 (5866) 49MB -
candidate: 2.21 (6005) 51MB -
beta: 3.0.0.beta7 (6240) 55MB -
edge: git-9a60cd9 (6251) 55MB -
2.0/stable: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/candidate: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/beta: ↑
2.0/edge: git-d71807e (6069) 20MB -

which means that there is the option to switch to the snap 'LTS'
version of LXD 2.0 ('2.0/stable').

Simos
gunnar.wagner
2018-03-30 03:08:15 UTC
Permalink
so the 'snap-only' policy I thought would be applied for LXD is not that
strict then and traditional .deb packages still exist?
Post by Simos Xenitellis
On Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 4:32 AM, gunnar.wagner
Post by Michel Jansens
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
I guess (as LXD is using snap packages by default, right) it's not a matter
of distribution any lomnger but more of distribution able to run snap
packages well (which not every distribution does as far as I know [i.e.
OpenSUSE])
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be based on LXD 3.0.xx, supported until 2018+5y = 2023.
Those that have the LXD snap ('lxd', stable channel), are likely to
get upgraded to 3.1, 3.2 and so on,
as the new versions appear.
It was mentioned on the forum in December that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will
have by default the .deb version of LXD 3.0.
This happened with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which has LXD 2.0.xx (currently at 2.0.11)
and is supported until 2021. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was launched with the
new LXD 2.0 at that time.
When you do 'snap info lxd', you get
...
stable: 2.21 (5866) 49MB -
candidate: 2.21 (6005) 51MB -
beta: 3.0.0.beta7 (6240) 55MB -
edge: git-9a60cd9 (6251) 55MB -
2.0/stable: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/candidate: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/beta: ↑
2.0/edge: git-d71807e (6069) 20MB -
which means that there is the option to switch to the snap 'LTS'
version of LXD 2.0 ('2.0/stable').
Simos
_______________________________________________
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http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
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Gunnar Wagner | Yongfeng Village Group 12 #5, Pujiang Town, Minhang
District, 201112 Shanghai, P.R. CHINA
mob +86.159.0094.1702 | skype: professorgunrad | wechat: 15900941702
Simos Xenitellis
2018-03-30 14:40:30 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 6:08 AM, gunnar.wagner
Post by gunnar.wagner
so the 'snap-only' policy I thought would be applied for LXD is not that
strict then and traditional .deb packages still exist?
The way I see it, is that it is just Ubuntu 18.04 LTS that gets the .deb package
and will keep having it until 2018+5=2023.

Ubuntu 16.04 will keep having LXD 2.0.x from the deb repositories
until 2016+5=2021.

Is it such an issue to have the snap version of LXD?

Simos
Post by gunnar.wagner
On Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 4:32 AM, gunnar.wagner
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
I guess (as LXD is using snap packages by default, right) it's not a matter
of distribution any lomnger but more of distribution able to run snap
packages well (which not every distribution does as far as I know [i.e.
OpenSUSE])
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be based on LXD 3.0.xx, supported until 2018+5y = 2023.
Those that have the LXD snap ('lxd', stable channel), are likely to
get upgraded to 3.1, 3.2 and so on,
as the new versions appear.
It was mentioned on the forum in December that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will
have by default the .deb version of LXD 3.0.
This happened with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which has LXD 2.0.xx (currently at 2.0.11)
and is supported until 2021. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was launched with the
new LXD 2.0 at that time.
When you do 'snap info lxd', you get
...
stable: 2.21 (5866) 49MB -
candidate: 2.21 (6005) 51MB -
beta: 3.0.0.beta7 (6240) 55MB -
edge: git-9a60cd9 (6251) 55MB -
2.0/stable: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/candidate: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/beta: ↑
2.0/edge: git-d71807e (6069) 20MB -
which means that there is the option to switch to the snap 'LTS'
version of LXD 2.0 ('2.0/stable').
Simos
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
---
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http://www.avg.com
--
Gunnar Wagner | Yongfeng Village Group 12 #5, Pujiang Town, Minhang
District, 201112 Shanghai, P.R. CHINA
mob +86.159.0094.1702 | skype: professorgunrad | wechat: 15900941702
_______________________________________________
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http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
Saint Michael
2018-03-31 00:42:49 UTC
Permalink
I am using LCX, plain vanilla. Is there a reading the can help me move to
LXD 3.0? I am afraid I cannot see why would anybody use LXD vs regular LXC.
I can do anything I need, so far, with LXC. To copy a container to another
server I use rsync with some special parameters.
In general what is the great advantage of using LXD?


On Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 10:40 AM, Simos Xenitellis <
Post by Simos Xenitellis
On Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 6:08 AM, gunnar.wagner
Post by gunnar.wagner
so the 'snap-only' policy I thought would be applied for LXD is not that
strict then and traditional .deb packages still exist?
The way I see it, is that it is just Ubuntu 18.04 LTS that gets the .deb package
and will keep having it until 2018+5=2023.
Ubuntu 16.04 will keep having LXD 2.0.x from the deb repositories
until 2016+5=2021.
Is it such an issue to have the snap version of LXD?
Simos
Post by gunnar.wagner
On Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 4:32 AM, gunnar.wagner
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
I guess (as LXD is using snap packages by default, right) it's not a
matter
Post by gunnar.wagner
of distribution any lomnger but more of distribution able to run snap
packages well (which not every distribution does as far as I know [i.e.
OpenSUSE])
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be based on LXD 3.0.xx, supported until 2018+5y = 2023.
Those that have the LXD snap ('lxd', stable channel), are likely to
get upgraded to 3.1, 3.2 and so on,
as the new versions appear.
It was mentioned on the forum in December that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will
have by default the .deb version of LXD 3.0.
This happened with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which has LXD 2.0.xx (currently at 2.0.11)
and is supported until 2021. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was launched with the
new LXD 2.0 at that time.
When you do 'snap info lxd', you get
...
stable: 2.21 (5866) 49MB -
candidate: 2.21 (6005) 51MB -
beta: 3.0.0.beta7 (6240) 55MB -
edge: git-9a60cd9 (6251) 55MB -
2.0/stable: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/candidate: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/beta: ↑
2.0/edge: git-d71807e (6069) 20MB -
which means that there is the option to switch to the snap 'LTS'
version of LXD 2.0 ('2.0/stable').
Simos
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
--
Gunnar Wagner | Yongfeng Village Group 12 #5, Pujiang Town, Minhang
District, 201112 Shanghai, P.R. CHINA
mob +86.159.0094.1702 | skype: professorgunrad | wechat: 15900941702
_______________________________________________
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http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
Sean McNamara
2018-03-31 00:53:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Saint Michael
I am using LCX, plain vanilla. Is there a reading the can help me move to
LXD 3.0? I am afraid I cannot see why would anybody use LXD vs regular LXC.
I can do anything I need, so far, with LXC. To copy a container to another
server I use rsync with some special parameters.
In general what is the great advantage of using LXD?
LXD is based on the same technologies as LXC, and has no special
kernel component, so it can only use the same kernel interfaces LXC
uses for containerization. So from that perspective, anything you can
do with LXC, you can do with LXD, and vice versa.

A major benefit of LXD is in the simplicity of setting up containers
that are isolated from the host and eachother, with the ability to
treat them like VMs with your security posture. To achieve that on LXC
is significantly more work.

Also, networking is IMO significantly easier with LXD for many common
setups. You won't notice much easier networking in LXD 2.0, but the
latest stable release (2.21) is certainly nice with the amount of work
it does for you.

The goal of LXD is to become as secure and simple as something like
kvm/qemu/vmware/virtualbox, but without any of the overhead of a
hypervisor, kernel on top of kernel, filesystem on top of filesystem,
etc.

See also: https://discuss.linuxcontainers.org/t/comparing-lxd-vs-lxc/24

Sean
Post by Saint Michael
On Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 10:40 AM, Simos Xenitellis
Post by Simos Xenitellis
On Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 6:08 AM, gunnar.wagner
Post by gunnar.wagner
so the 'snap-only' policy I thought would be applied for LXD is not that
strict then and traditional .deb packages still exist?
The way I see it, is that it is just Ubuntu 18.04 LTS that gets the .deb package
and will keep having it until 2018+5=2023.
Ubuntu 16.04 will keep having LXD 2.0.x from the deb repositories
until 2016+5=2021.
Is it such an issue to have the snap version of LXD?
Simos
Post by gunnar.wagner
On Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 4:32 AM, gunnar.wagner
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
I guess (as LXD is using snap packages by default, right) it's not a matter
of distribution any lomnger but more of distribution able to run snap
packages well (which not every distribution does as far as I know [i.e.
OpenSUSE])
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be based on LXD 3.0.xx, supported until 2018+5y = 2023.
Those that have the LXD snap ('lxd', stable channel), are likely to
get upgraded to 3.1, 3.2 and so on,
as the new versions appear.
It was mentioned on the forum in December that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will
have by default the .deb version of LXD 3.0.
This happened with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which has LXD 2.0.xx (currently at 2.0.11)
and is supported until 2021. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was launched with the
new LXD 2.0 at that time.
When you do 'snap info lxd', you get
...
stable: 2.21 (5866) 49MB -
candidate: 2.21 (6005) 51MB -
beta: 3.0.0.beta7 (6240) 55MB -
edge: git-9a60cd9 (6251) 55MB -
2.0/stable: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/candidate: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/beta: ↑
2.0/edge: git-d71807e (6069) 20MB -
which means that there is the option to switch to the snap 'LTS'
version of LXD 2.0 ('2.0/stable').
Simos
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
--
Gunnar Wagner | Yongfeng Village Group 12 #5, Pujiang Town, Minhang
District, 201112 Shanghai, P.R. CHINA
mob +86.159.0094.1702 | skype: professorgunrad | wechat: 15900941702
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
Saint Michael
2018-03-31 01:09:53 UTC
Permalink
How do I get LXD 3.0 into regular ubuntu server 16.04.4 LTS (GNU/Linux
4.12.14-041214-generic x86_64)?
Post by Saint Michael
Post by Saint Michael
I am using LCX, plain vanilla. Is there a reading the can help me move to
LXD 3.0? I am afraid I cannot see why would anybody use LXD vs regular
LXC.
Post by Saint Michael
I can do anything I need, so far, with LXC. To copy a container to
another
Post by Saint Michael
server I use rsync with some special parameters.
In general what is the great advantage of using LXD?
LXD is based on the same technologies as LXC, and has no special
kernel component, so it can only use the same kernel interfaces LXC
uses for containerization. So from that perspective, anything you can
do with LXC, you can do with LXD, and vice versa.
A major benefit of LXD is in the simplicity of setting up containers
that are isolated from the host and eachother, with the ability to
treat them like VMs with your security posture. To achieve that on LXC
is significantly more work.
Also, networking is IMO significantly easier with LXD for many common
setups. You won't notice much easier networking in LXD 2.0, but the
latest stable release (2.21) is certainly nice with the amount of work
it does for you.
The goal of LXD is to become as secure and simple as something like
kvm/qemu/vmware/virtualbox, but without any of the overhead of a
hypervisor, kernel on top of kernel, filesystem on top of filesystem,
etc.
See also: https://discuss.linuxcontainers.org/t/comparing-lxd-vs-lxc/24
Sean
Post by Saint Michael
On Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 10:40 AM, Simos Xenitellis
Post by Simos Xenitellis
On Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 6:08 AM, gunnar.wagner
Post by gunnar.wagner
so the 'snap-only' policy I thought would be applied for LXD is not
that
Post by Saint Michael
Post by Simos Xenitellis
Post by gunnar.wagner
strict then and traditional .deb packages still exist?
The way I see it, is that it is just Ubuntu 18.04 LTS that gets the .deb package
and will keep having it until 2018+5=2023.
Ubuntu 16.04 will keep having LXD 2.0.x from the deb repositories
until 2016+5=2021.
Is it such an issue to have the snap version of LXD?
Simos
Post by gunnar.wagner
On Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 4:32 AM, gunnar.wagner
Does this means LXD 3.0 will be part of Ubuntu 18.04 next month?
I guess (as LXD is using snap packages by default, right) it's not a matter
of distribution any lomnger but more of distribution able to run snap
packages well (which not every distribution does as far as I know
[i.e.
Post by Saint Michael
Post by Simos Xenitellis
Post by gunnar.wagner
OpenSUSE])
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be based on LXD 3.0.xx, supported until 2018+5y
=
Post by Saint Michael
Post by Simos Xenitellis
Post by gunnar.wagner
2023.
Those that have the LXD snap ('lxd', stable channel), are likely to
get upgraded to 3.1, 3.2 and so on,
as the new versions appear.
It was mentioned on the forum in December that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will
have by default the .deb version of LXD 3.0.
This happened with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which has LXD 2.0.xx (currently
at
Post by Saint Michael
Post by Simos Xenitellis
Post by gunnar.wagner
2.0.11)
and is supported until 2021. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was launched with the
new LXD 2.0 at that time.
When you do 'snap info lxd', you get
...
stable: 2.21 (5866) 49MB -
candidate: 2.21 (6005) 51MB -
beta: 3.0.0.beta7 (6240) 55MB -
edge: git-9a60cd9 (6251) 55MB -
2.0/stable: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/candidate: 2.0.11 (5384) 21MB -
2.0/beta: ↑
2.0/edge: git-d71807e (6069) 20MB -
which means that there is the option to switch to the snap 'LTS'
version of LXD 2.0 ('2.0/stable').
Simos
_______________________________________________
lxc-users mailing list
http://lists.linuxcontainers.org/listinfo/lxc-users
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
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Andrey Repin
2018-03-31 22:10:25 UTC
Permalink
Greetings, Saint Michael!
Post by Saint Michael
I am using LCX, plain vanilla. Is there a reading the can help me move to
LXD 3.0?
Do you NEED to move to LXD, to begin with?
Post by Saint Michael
I am afraid I cannot see why would anybody use LXD vs regular LXC.
Mass deployment of similar containers.
Post by Saint Michael
I can do anything I need, so far, with LXC. To copy a container to another
server I use rsync with some special parameters.
In general what is the great advantage of using LXD?
See above. LXD is more suitable for automated (re)deployment of likewise
containers.

If all you need is an occasional isolation of an experimental/production
environment, LXC is more than enough.
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With best regards,
Andrey Repin
Sunday, April 1, 2018 01:08:24

Sorry for my terrible english...
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